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Rekero & Naboisho Habari

Cheetah conservation in the Mara

Generally February is a dry, hot and windy month, however 2013 has proved to be quite different. This year it has begun with rain and more rain. The grass is so long and green you could be mistaken for thinking it is June. Now though, the days are hot and the skies cloudless.

It has been a fabulous month for wildlife and in particular cheetah. Malaika and her cub are both doing very well. He has now almost mastered the art of car climbing; a trick made famous by his mother. Without fail Malaika delights guests and gives them an encounter of a lifetime. We are thinking perhaps we need to custom-design her a nice roof hatch cushion as with the hot sun the roof hatches get too hot for her paws!


The Lookout Hill cheetah and her three cubs are also doing well. The cubs are getting so big and one in particular is very fierce. Those who have been following our Facebook page will have already seen the incredible pictures Con took of the encounter between them and a hyena. One of these feisty cubs is also jumping on cars, which is unusual as his mum has not taught him… interesting! These four move great distances; from Lookout all the way past the ridge and almost to Governor’s.

Honey’s Boys have been in and out and then interestingly we have two newcomers; both single females and one whom we believe to have very young cubs on Rhino Ridge. Initial thoughts are that they are part of the three daughters of Shakira.

We are so excited to have all these cheetah around and they could not have come at a more opportune moment. We are in the process of launching a Cheetah Research Project together with the Kenya Wildlife Trust.

The global cheetah population is rapidly dwindling and with less than 10,000 individuals left in the wild, cheetahs are vulnerable to extinction. The KWT’s Mara Ecosystem Cheetah Project which will determine the current status of cheetahs in the Greater Mara eco-system and to identify the major threats that could be causing declines in the current cheetah population – a study which will have important implications for cheetah conservation both in Kenya and in the rest of Africa. The Project will be led by Ms. Femke Broekhuis of Oxford University’s Wildlife Research Unit (WildCRU).

Visit www.kenyawildlifetrust.org for more information about this Cheetah Project. We will keep you posted on the progress and hope to share some good news over the coming months with you. So please keep an eye on our Facebook page and this monthly Habari!

Salaams to you all,

Best wishes from Clea, Con, Mariana & the Rekero crew


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The Mara cheetahs